coffee-on-my-lips-blog

Creatures Of Habit: How We All May Be Sabotaging Our Lips (Pt 2)

COML Staff

Part 2: Every Breath You Take

Most of us don’t pay much attention to our breathing, usually because we tend not to notice a thing until there’s something wrong with it. We take the normal working of our bodies for granted, until something interrupts it.



Now, this post isn’t meant to shame anyone — everybody, at some point, has heard “mouth breather” used as an insult — but a lot more people do it than most of us realize. And a lot of us do it, too, usually without realizing it.

But getting back to taking things for granted: A lot of us only really catch ourselves doing it during those times when we can’t breathe through our noses. When you have a stuffy head, or just a stuffy nose, you might notice yourself breathing through your mouth — sometimes, it’s the only way we can. Have you ever noticed that chapped lips tend to go hand in hand with head colds? Well, that’s no coincidence.

The passage of breath over the skin of your lips has the same effect on it as dry, hot air — it leeches moisture from the surface of your lips. Keep in mind that the surface skin of your lips, as mentioned in (link)this post(/link) is much thinner than the surface skin of the rest of your body — you can lose a lot of moisture to evaporation, very quickly. That’s how a head cold leads to chapped lips — and if a person breathes through the mouth as a matter of habit, that same mechanism is working against you all the time.

Lip balm can help to minimize the effect — but the effect can be minimized even further by a change in habits. New habits take time to form, so while you’re forming them, you should absolutely choose a lip balm that will offer maximum protection — might we suggest our own?